Striebig help architectural students embrace digital modelling

Striebig saw at University of Westminster

The new Fabrication Laboratory recently opened at the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment at the University of Westminster in London will enable students to produce architectural models using the latest digital technology.

A large array of advanced digital equipment will provide ABS and plaster 3D printing, CNC knife cutting, large-scale CNC routing, CNC metal milling and robot fabrication.

To complement this digital equipment, a Striebig Compact vertical panel saw was chosen for use in the Fabrication Laboratory. The saw will allow technicians and students to size pieces of material, mainly MDF, plywood and acrylic sheeting, for use in advanced modelling.

Dr David Scott, senior lecturer and academic leader for the Fabrication Laboratory, said: “We chose all our equipment with the same priorities in mind. As it is for student use, apart from cutting accurately it had to be robust, reliable, easy to use, and as safe as possible. In the case of the vertical saw, there was only really one choice, the Striebig, as it’s far ahead of the competition. It has lived up to our expectations 100 per cent and we are very happy with our purchase.”

The Faculty decided on a Striebig Compact 4164 model, which is the smallest of the nine models in the entry-level saw range, because as well as having limited space they had no need for a bigger or more sophisticated machine.

Fabrication Laboratory technicians, who have been trained in the use of the saw and who will supervise students in its operation, like its tough construction and its smoothness, both of the saw unit and the vertical and horizontal axis of movement.

With a cutting range of 3100 x 1644mm (10 ft x 5 ft) and a maximum depth of cut of 60mm, the Compact 4164 guarantees impressive dust limit values of well below 1mg/m3.

All Compact saws are based on a single, fully welded sawing frame to give decades of reliable service whilst maintaining cutting precision. They can be wall-mounted or freestanding and can cut practically all wood-based sheet materials as well as timber, plaster board, plastics, composites and aluminium panels.

Dr Scott added: “The new Fabrication Laboratory will allow students to immerse themselves in and explore the exciting and rapidly expanding field of digital fabrication. It gives them a fantastic opportunity to produce work of the highest quality, offering new design possibilities and creative outcomes.”

Swiss-built Striebig vertical panel saws, also known as wall saws, continue to be the most popular choice for panel processors.

Striebig’s portfolio consists of five machine series catering for all sizing needs; the entry-level Compact, the Standard, the Evolution, the Control and the latest 4D sawing centre.

All models, apart from the 4D, are available in no less than nine sizes with an extensive selection of options available to improve their effectiveness still further. Machines can also be built in special sizes and fitted with specialist equipment to suit individual requirements.

The Striebig Standard is a popular choice with panel processors.

The Striebig Standard is a popular choice with panel processors.

The entry-level Compact series, with a cutting range 3100 x1644 x 80mm to 5350 x 2220 x 80mm, includes an automated cut cycle version, the Compact AV, to make them even more productive.

The popular Standard series – which has been tried and tested over decades – comes in cutting sizes 3300 x 1680 x 80mm to 5300 x 2240x 80mm, and is the perfect saw for companies of all sizes.

The fully-automatic Control series offers an optional Electronic Positioning System (EPS) on both axes for the automatic positioning of both the length stop and saw head. This increases the saws’ productivity by delivering automatic repeat strip and upper trim cutting.

With manual feeding of the saw unit eliminated the operator’s job is made easier, giving him ample time to prepare the next job. Numerous procedures are carried out at the press of a button, including locking and releasing the beam saw, setting the horizontal cutting height, plunging and swivelling the motor, locking the support rollers during sawing and fine saw blade adjustment.

Where high levels of panel throughput are needed, the Control and the Evolution, with cutting sizes from 3300 x 1680mm to 5300 x 2240mm, offer an optional 100mm cutting depth. The Evolution has many similar features to the Control, making it one of the most advanced manual panel saws available.

Striebig’s latest 4D high-end sawing centre machine can optimize and cut a full panel without the operator needing to re-handle it once it is loaded. It’s the world’s first vertical panel saw to offer intelligent cut optimization, even for the most complicated panel and strip cutting work. Delivering a cutting range of 5300 x 2100mm, the Striebig 4D comes with the option for cut depths of 80, 105 or 130mm.

Striebig saws are available from sole UK sales agent, T.M. Machinery Sales. Alongside machine sales and installations, sister company T.M. Services & Spares repairs and maintains a wide range of woodworking machinery, including every type of saw.


For further information contact Matt Pearce, Sales Director on 0116 271 7155 or email sales@tmservices.co.uk

Issued by Stephen Barry Publicity. Tel: 020 8341 6660. Email: stephenbarry@clara.co.uk